Daisuke Iguchi



Shuto ginsai tsubo, 2016
Shuto ginsai tsubo, 2016
Wheel thrown clay, rice powder ashes, silver


Kuro shuto ginsai zara
Kuro shuto ginsai zara
Clay, metal oxide (iron oxide, cobalt oxide, manganese oxide, chromium oxide), rice powder ashes, silver


Shuhento ginsaiki, 2016
Shuhento ginsaiki, 2016
Wheel thrown clay, metal oxide (iron oxide, cobalt oxide, manganese oxide, chromium oxide), rice powder ashes, silver
36 x 30 x 31 cm
14.2 x 11.8 x 12.2 in

Shuhento tsubo, 2016
Shuhento tsubo, 2016
Whell thrown clay, metal oxide (iron oxide, cobalt oxide, manganese oxide, chromium oxide), rice powder ashes, lime


detail
detail





detail
detail





detail
detail


Shuhento tsubo, 2016
Shuhento tsubo, 2016
Whell thrown clay, metal oxide (iron oxide, cobalt oxide, manganese oxide, chromium oxide), rice powder ashes, lime


, detail
, detail
Clay, metal oxide (iron oxide, cobalt oxide, manganese oxide, chromium oxide), rice powder ashes, silver


Kuro shuto ginsai zara, detail
Kuro shuto ginsai zara, detail
Clay, metal oxide (iron oxide, cobalt oxide, manganese oxide, chromium oxide), rice powder ashes, silver


Shuto ginsai tsubo, detail, 2016
Shuto ginsai tsubo, detail, 2016
Wheel thrown clay, rice powder ashes, silver





Japanese, born in 1975 in Tochigi, Japan
Lives and works in Tochigi, Japan

 


The ceramics of Daisuke Iguchi have the presence of ritual artefacts and sacred objects. Iguschi is interested in the aesthetic qualities of patinated iron and moss-covered stones, and has gone through an extensive empirical research to be able to reproduce these effects on the surface of his vessels.
Embracing the concept of Sabi - an admiration of that which is old and faded - Iguchi’s works celebrate the wearing effect of time on all things. His vessels are hand-build and given a skin that is typical of the artworks of Igushi : a textured, old-metal lustre and oxydised patina obtained through the application of ashes, precise firings, and polishing. The curves and volumes of his elegant and ample shapes are highlighted by Iguchi’s characteristic pattern of parallel white lines. Through the process of their making his artworks grow a personal history evidenced in their uncanny aura of antiques and other worn-out artefacts.

Iguchi was awarded the Judge’s Special Prize in 2008 Mashiko togeiten (Mashiko Ceramic Art Exhibition) as well as the Governor of Tokyo prize at the 2014 Eastern Japan Traditional Art Crafts Exhibition.